Cache Memory – Set Associative Mapped Cache

Cache Memory – Set Associative Mapped Cache

Set Associative mapping scheme combines the simplicity of Direct mapping with the flexibility of Fully Associative mapping. It is more practical than Fully Associative mapping because the associative portion is limited to just a few slots that make up a set.

In this mapping mechanism, the cache memory is divided into ‘v’ sets, each consisting of ‘n’ cache lines. A block from Main memory is first mapped onto a specific cache set, and then it can be placed anywhere within that set. This type of mapping has very efficient ratio between implementation and efficiency. The set is usually chosen by

Cache set number = (Main memory block number) MOD (Number of sets in the cache memory)

If there are ‘n’ cache lines in a set, the cache placement is called n-way set associative i.e. if there are two blocks or cache lines per set, then it is a 2-way set associative cache mapping and four blocks or cache lines per set, then it is a 4-way set associative cache mapping.
Let us assume we have a Main Memory of size 4GB (232), with each byte directly addressable by a 32-bit address. We will divide Main memory into blocks of each 32 bytes (25). Thus there are 128M (i.e. 232/25 = 227) blocks in Main memory.

We have a Cache memory of 512KB (i.e. 219), divided into blocks of each 32 bytes (25). Thus there are 16K (i.e. 219/25 = 214) blocks also known as Cache slots or Cache lines in cache memory. It is clear from above numbers that there are more Main memory blocks than Cache slots.

NOTE: The Main memory is not physically partitioned in the given way, but this is the view of Main memory that the cache sees.

NOTE: We are dividing both Main Memory and cache memory into blocks of same size i.e. 32 bytes.

Let us try 2-way set associative cache mapping i.e. 2 cache lines per set. We will divide 16K cache lines into sets of 2 and hence there are 8K (214/2 = 213) sets in the Cache memory.

Cache Size = (Number of Sets) * (Size of each set) * (Cache line size)

So even using the above formula we can find out number of sets in the Cache memory i.e.

219 = (Number of Sets) * 2 * 25

Number of Sets = 219 / (2 * 25) = 213.

Memory
Memory

When an address is mapped to a set, the direct mapping scheme is used, and then associative mapping is used within a set. The format for an address has 13 bits in the set field, which identifies the set in which the addressed word will be found if it is in the cache. There are five bits for the word field as before and there is 14-bit tag field that together make up the remaining 32 bits of the address as shown below:

memory
Memory

As an example of how the set associative cache views a Main memory address, consider again the address (A035F014)16. The leftmost 14 bits form the tag field, followed by 13 bits for the set field, followed by five bits for the word field as shown below:

set associative cache views
set associative cache views

In the below example we have chosen the block 14 from Main memory and compared it with the different block replacement algorithms. In Direct Mapped cache it can be placed in Frame 6 since 14 mod 8 = 6. In Set associative cache it can be placed in set 2.

Set associative cache
Set associative cache

Checkout one more solved problem below.

 Set Associative mapped
Set Associative mapped

Walid BaniHani

 

College of Applied Sciences - Al Rustaq

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